HISTORY OF CANTONMENT ATKINSON

 

(Transcribed by Leora White)

  

  

Compiled by Helen Wentz

 

Daughters of the American Revolution

 Calcasieu Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution

1950

 

 

          A granite marker was first placed by Calcasieu Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution on the City Hall lawn in 1940, because the site of Fort Atkinson was so inaccessible at that time.  With the opening of a highway past – even crossing – the old fort site, they have moved the marker to the actual site of Cantonment Atkinson.

         

          The history of the camp reaches far into the past, to the time, when the western boundaries of Colonial Louisiana were by no means well defined.  Spain claimed almost to the middle of what is now Louisiana, while France claimed to the Brazos and Trinity Rivers.  The entire area was a vast wilderness.  In the western part on the Calcasieu River, the pine forests were among the finest in the world.  These forests extended over one hundred miles north, and many old settlers remembered these splendid tracts of virgin timber.  There were marshes in the lower country on the Gulf coast and much of the land gave little promise of the wealth it contained on the surface, and beneath that heavily wooded surface, where oil and sulphur deposits awaited future developments.

 

          Calcasieu Parish, claimed by both France and Spain, became a no-man’s-land and finally part of the United States.  The original territory claimed by LaSalle for France was transferred to Spain, returned to France, and then purchased by President Thomas Jefferson in 1803.  There followed a dispute between the United States and Spain over the territory between the Calcasieu River and the Sabine River.  The question was if this land had been included in that returned to France by Spain and therefore included in the Louisiana Purchase.

 

          Lengthy hearings were held to determine the ownership of this stretch of land, then inhabited chiefly by the Attakapas, Caronsheqay, Caushatta, Alabama, and Choctaw Indians, who gave little trouble then, or later, when they came to Lake Charles to sell their blankets and barter for the few articles they deemed necessary.  They were by no means hostile, but went about their business quietly.

 

          Spain sent troops almost to the Red River; French troops, and later American troops made sorties on the plains.  While there was no open conflict, there was almost constant threat and trouble.

 

          As the gateway to the Southwest, Louisiana played a prominent part in the expansionist movement that brought on the Mexican War.  Many of its citizens joined the American wagon trains that rambled across Louisiana and over the San Antonio Trace into Texas.

 

          After the Louisiana Purchase, the United States government took action to protect its rights.

 

          In 1819, by the Treaty of Washington, Spain abandoned all claim to land east of the Sabine River.  Following the formal transfer, July 17, 1821, the United States moved in to establish order in the neutral corridor, which, during the long diplomatic wrangle, had been the refuge of outlaws, murderers, and adventurers, most of whom preyed on the swelling tide of Texas-bound emigrants.  In 1822, the War Department established Fort Jessup as the central stronghold on the new frontier – near Natchitoches, on the San Antonio Trace (El Camino Real or King’s Highway), a day’s march from the Sabine.  It was here that Lt. U. S. Grant served a part of his apprenticeship as a soldier.

 

          During the illicit warfare following the Louisiana Purchase, Calcasieu River and the chain of lakes through which it flows in its winding course to the Gulf of Mexico made a safe and swift passage to hideaways for pirates and trespassers.  It was to protect our state and city from depredations that the cantonment, Camp Atkinson, was built by the Government.

 

          Authority for the establishment of this post was given in a letter from headquarters of the Army, dated November 20, 1829, to Col. James B. Many, of the Seventh U. S. Infantry then stationed at Cantonment Jessup near Natchitoches.  In this communication Colonel Many was instructed to detach one company of his regiment to establish a western boundary defense post at Lake Charles where the road from Galveston to New Orleans then passed.  Such commerce as then existed moved over the Old Spanish Trail and along the Calcasieu River to the Gulf.  A road connected with the old “Military Road” to Natchitoches.

 

          The reason for this action was explained in a letter from the headquarters of the army the following year.  This temporary post was established at the instance of the Treasury Department with a view of suppressing any illicit trade that might come from Mexico through the Gulf and up the Calcasieu River; and for this purpose the commanding officer of the troops was appointed as inspector of customs.

         

          Company E, Seventh U. S. Infantry, appears to have arrived at Lake Charles in January 1830 with Captain George Birch commanding.  Until July of that year the post was referred to simply as “Camp Lake Charles” or “The Post at Calcasieu,” but thereafter it was called Cantonment Atkinson in honor of Brevet Brigadier General Henry Atkinson, Sixth U. S. Infantry, who, according to  The Louisiana Guide, was the first Adjutant General of the United States Army, appointed by President Monroe in 1822.

 

          On November 8, 1831, Company E, Seventh U. S. Infantry was relieved by Company F, Third U. S. Infantry, Captain T. J. Harrison commanding.  This unit remained at the Post until January 2, 1832, when it left to rejoin its regiment at Fort Jessup.  There is no indication that the Post was occupied again by United States troops.

 

          There were no battles of significance, but the results were tremendously important to this section and to the nation.  It is entirely possible that because of the work of the United States Army here that this disputed Rio Hondo area became recognized as a part of the United States  before the Texas revolution and the subsequent admission of Texas into the Union.

 

          A United States Government Survey map of Cantonment Atkinson, presented to Calcasieu Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, by the Hon. J. Fair Hardin, of Shreveport, now hangs in the Gray Memorial American Legion Home here in Lake Charles.

                                                                         

          The military post was established on Lake Charles, latitude 30° 13', longitude 16° 12' from Washington, Township 9 South, range 8 West, in the northwest part of the town of Lake Charles, on what later became the property of the J. A. Bel Lumber Company.  Not long after the camp was abandoned Thomas Bilbo purchased the property.  The fort was a log structure, which was enlarged in the late 1880’s by J. L. Bilbo and used for many years as a family residence.  It was all torn away when the Bel Lumber Company purchased the old home place from the Bilbo heirs, who reserved the acre used for a cemetery.

         

          Parenthetically:  Thomas Bilbo married Ann Lawrence, and their daughter Rebecca Bilbo married Jacob Ryan.  For them, three of our main streets were named.  McNeese and Belden streets were named for Bilbo sons-in-law.

 

          The old Bel mill site, down on the lake front, with the Bilbo family cemetery adjoining, is quite changed today.  All the old familiar landmarks that were connected with the operation of the sawmill have been obliterated.  The Bel office has been remodeled and nothing but the brickwork of the old office vault is left to remind the present generation of the days when that section of town was a center of activity and the buzz of the saws and blasts of whistles, ships in the lake, hundreds of workmen going about their duties, made the old Camp Atkinson site a center of industry.

 

          The marker is something that will endure to remind us of the early history and significant achievements in our area.

 

Compiled by Miss Helen Wentz from data in the files of Calcasieu Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, and read at rededication services October 30, 1958. 

 


 

General Services Administration

National Archives and Records Service

Washington 25, D. C.

 

June 29, 1951 

 

Mr. Sam H. Jones

P.O. Box 1322

Lake Charles, Louisiana

 

Dear Mr. Jones:

 

          Your letter of June 15, 1951, addressed to the Department of the Army requesting information relating to Cantonment Atkinson has been referred to this agency.

 

          A search of the records of the War Department in the National Archives does not show definite dates for the establishment and abandonment of Cantonment Atkinson.  There appear to be no post returns prior to June 1830 and the regimental returns of the 7th U. S. Infantry do not give a date of establishment.  The post was established as early as March 2, 1830 because Capt. George Birch wrote a letter to the Adjutant General‘s Office from Cantonment Atkinson stating that he was transmitting his returns.  Prior letters of Capt. Birch do not carry the Atkinson date line.  The returns of the 3rd U. S. Infantry indicate that Company F arrived at Cantonment Atkinson on November 7, 1831, rather than November 8 to relieve the Company E 7th U. S. Infantry.  The returns of the 3rd U. S. Infantry do not indicate the exact date of abandonment beyond giving the station for Company F at Cantonment Atkinson for December 1831 and Fort Jessup in January 1832.  That abandonment was contemplated is shown by Special Orders, No. 130, The Adjutant General’s Office, October 31, 1831, ordering that the cantonment be abandoned “without delay.”

 

Very truly yours,

             

(Signed Richard G. Wood)

Richard G. Wood

Chief, Army Section

War Records Branch

 

Letter and accompanying data from the Library of Congress presented to Calcasieu Chapter, D. A. R., by Mark D. Wentz

 


 

Library of Congress
Washington 25, D. C.

 

Legislative Reference Service

Cantonment Atkinson, Lake Charles, Louisiana

(Quotations with comment and evaluation)

 

          “This part of the Louisiana Purchase was in dispute, first between Spain and the United States and, after the Mexican Revolution in 1821, between Mexico and the United States…..While there was no open conflict there was almost constant threat of trouble, and in 1830 the United States established Cantonment Atkinson on what is now the property of the J. A. Bel Lumber Company, in the northwest part of Lake Charles.  The cantonment was named for General Henry Atkinson, the first adjutant general of the U. S. Army, appointed by President Monroe in 1822.”

 

Source:   Workers of the Writer’s Program, Louisiana, A Guide to the State. New York: Hastings House, 1941-1949. p. 282.

 

          In the foregoing quotation the date 1830 has been verified from primary sources.  No confirmation has been found for the statement that General Henry Atkinson was the first adjutant general of the U. S. Army, appointed by President Monroe in 1822.  Various published accounts (Hamersly, Heitman, etc.) of General Atkinson’s military record fail to mention this.  The cantonment was named for him, but not apparently because of any direct personal connection which he sustained to it. No evidence has been found that he was located there.

 

          The following is a copy of a brief account of Cantonment Atkinson make by the former Historical Section of the Army War College:

 

          “Camp Atkinson, Louisiana, latitude 30° 13', longitude 16°'* 12' west of Washington."

 

          “A temporary United States camp located on Lake Charles, an extension of the Calcasieu River near the present site of the town of Lake Charles, Calcasieu County, Louisiana."

 

          “Established in April or May, 1830, by Company E, Seventh Infantry, Captain George Birch commanding, and named in honor of Colonel and Brevet Brigadier General Henry Atkinson, who was in command of the Western Department.  On the 8th of November, 1831, this garrison was succeeded by Company F, Third Infantry, Captain T. J. Harrison, and January 2, 1932, the post was abandoned, the garrison being transferred to Fort Jessup, Louisiana.”

 

          The foregoing account is a typewritten report in the possession of the Department of Defense, Office of the Chief of Military History, Operations Division, General Reference Branch.  The sources on which this account was based (mainly post returns and general orders of the Adjutant General’s Office) are housed with the National Archives and Records Service.

 

          Mr. Richard G. Wood of the National Archives and Records Service checked these sources so far as he was able and examined also official correspondence of Captain Birch and Captain Harrison.

 

          Mr. Wood reports that there is a letter written by Captain George Birch of Company E, Seventh Infantry, from “Camp Lake Charles” as early as March 2, 1830.  If this was the same as Cantonment Atkinson, it would seem that at least the General’s name had not been attached to the camp so early.

 

          The identity of the Companies and their Captains is confirmed by the Post Returns.  At to the date, November 8, for the change of garrison, Mr. Wood could find only that Company F, Third Infantry, arrived at the Cantonment November 7, 1831, for that purpose.  Of course, if they arrived late on November 7th it is very possible that they did not assume control until the 8th, so there is no necessary conflict in these dates, though neither is there exact corroboration.   It would be safe to say that the change of garrison took place “early in November.”  This would avoid any possible error which might be made if the exact day were stated. Likewise, it would be safer, in view of such data as have been found, to say that the Cantonment was first occupied “early in 1830” or “in the first half of 1830,” rather than to name any month with certainty.

 

          Mr. Wood states that the date for abandonment, January 2, 1832, may well be correct, although he has not been able to verify it exactly.  In November, 1831, the garrison at Cantonment Atkinson was ordered to vacate “forthwith” and to proceed to Camp Jessup.  However, the Post Return for December, 1831, was sent from Cantonment Atkinson.  The Return for January, 1832, was sent from Jessup. It would be safe to say that Cantonment Atkinson was occupied through the year 1831, and was then transferred to Fort Jessup.

 

          Photostat copies of the sources referred to, Post Returns, General Orders of the Adjutant General’s Office, official correspondence of the Captains stationed at Cantonment Atkinson, may be obtained at cost from The National Archives and Records Service, Washington 25, D. C.  (attention Mr. Richard G. Wood).

 

(Signed Harold E. Snide)

History and General Research Section

June 28, 1951

 


 

Congress of the United States

House of Representatives

Washington, D.C.

 

June 16, 1955

 

Mrs. John S. Weitz

Contraband Place

Lake Charles, Louisiana

 

Dear Mrs. Weitz:

         

          I have finally located a bit of information about Camp Atkinson and am enclosing the report I received from National Archives.  I hope this is of value to you, and please let me know if I may be of further service.

  

With kindest regards, I am sincerely yours,

 

(Signed) T. A. Thompson, M. C.

 


 

General Services Administration

 National Archives and Records Service
Washington 25, D.C.

 

June 15, 1955

 

Reference Service Report

Inquiry:  Camp Atkinson, Louisiana

 

          Report:  A search of the records of the War Department in the National Archives has disclosed the following information: 

 

          Camp Atkinson, Louisiana, was a temporary United States camp, located on Lake Charles, an extension of the Calcasieu River near the present site of the town of Lake Charles, Calcasieu County, Louisiana.

 

          This post was established in April or May, 1830, by Company E, 7th Infantry, Captain George Birch commanding, and was named in honor of Colonel and Brevet Brigadier General Henry Atkinson, who was in command of the Western Department.  On November 8, 1831, this garrison was succeeded by Company F, 3rd Infantry, Captain T. J.  Harrison commanding.  On January 2, 1932, the post was abandoned and the garrison was transferred to  Fort Jessup, Louisiana.  

               

(Signed)                                                                    

James A. Kane

Old Army Section

 


 

J. Fair Hardin

Attorney at Law

1026 Giddens Lane Bldg.

Shreveport, Louisiana

 

March 23, 1933 

 

Mrs. A. F. Davies

Fenton, Louisiana

 

Dear Mrs. Davies:

         

          I thank you very much for your letter of the fifteenth, enclosing copy of your brief article on Cantonment Atkinson.  I shall write Mr. Mayo, whom I know quite well, for the Township and Range Number of the map on which the location of Cantonment Atkinson is noted so that I can get a copy of that from the General Land Office in Washington.  It would be interesting for your Chapter to get a copy of that Flat, also, as a real historical map relating to your section.  They cost less than a dollar each, and it would be interesting to have a copy framed in your High School, City hall or Library.

 

          The Quarterly of the Louisiana Historical Society is not sold, but is sent only to the members of the Society.  If you would like to be a member I shall be glad to recommend you for membership.  I enclose an application blank, and if you will fill out and return it with the membership fee of $2.00 I shall be glad to send it in. I think you will find the Quarterly interesting.

 

          I am quite familiar with the booklet, “Know Louisiana,” as I helped Mr. Ewing to compile it.  I suggest that you write him and send him your information on Camp Atkinson so that he can include it in his next edition in connection with Lake Charles.  He likes to get all of revisions possible.  His address is care of the Highway Commission.

 

          I have procured the loan from L.S.U. of the thesis on the History of Lake Charles, by Ferguson, and am now reading it.  It is a book of more than 150 pages, but so far I have not found a reference to Cantonment Atkinson in it.  He seems to have overlooked a very important item.  Otherwise he seems to have been very thorough.

 

          I hope that you will work with Mr. and Mrs. Mayo on a history of Lake Charles for possible publication in the Quarterly in the future.

 

 Yours very sincerely,

(Signed)

J. Fair Hardin


 

J. Fair Hardin

Attorney at Law

1026 Giddens Lane Bldg.

Shreveport, Louisiana

 

April 8, 1933

 

Mrs. A. F. Davies

Fenton, Louisiana

 

My dear Mrs. Davies:

 

          I have procured a copy of the Map showing the exact location of Cantonment Atkinson, a very good looking map, showing a portion of the Lake and the river near by, and showing the Cantonment on it.  I should be glad to give this to the City, to be placed either in the Library or the City Hall or the High School.  It should be framed, however, and hung up, as my experience is that if this is not done with maps they are never seen and rapidly deteriorate.  It can be framed at an expense of not more than $2.50 or $3.00, perhaps less.  It is also interesting as showing the location of the early settlements around Lake Charles, that is the farms of that period.

 

          I should prefer to give this through your local D.A.R. rather then directly – in other words, I would prefer that it appear as coming from you (rather) than from me, for you are a local organization, whereas my interest in it is a purely impersonal one, and I am primarily interested in stimulating interest in the local history.  That can best be done if things of this sort are done through local people.  It would likewise be something for your Chapter to do it in connection with the city’s history.

 

          Please let me know if you are interested in the matter, and if you would care to have the map framed, and I will have it properly inscribed, framed and sent to whomever you may direct, or I can bring it when I come down there in May for Federal Court, or before.

 

Yours very sincerely,

(Signed)

 J. Fair Hardin  

 


 

J. Fair Hardin

Attorney at Law

1026 Giddens Lane Bldg.

Shreveport, Louisiana

 

April 14, 1933

 

Mrs. A. F. Davies

Fenton, Louisiana

 

Dear Mrs. Davies:

 

          I have your letter of the 10th.  Upon your assurance that you have given that you will have the map framed and will place it where it will stimulate historical interest, I am having it inscribed appropriately as presented by your Chapter, and I shall mail it to you just as soon as I get it back.  There will of course be no charge for that. The reason that I insist upon it being framed and permanently placed is because I have had previous experience in such matters, in which I have given maps which took much time and work for me to locate and acquire from the War Dept., the Land Office, and from the British Museum and the Archives of the Indies at Seville, only to learn later, after the enthusiasm of the moment passed, they were simply thrown aside.  One that I even had framed, of Ft. Jessup, to be placed in the restored building there; I happen to know is reposing on the floor in a closet in an office in Many!  My purpose in this work is to stimulate and preserve historical interest.  I don’t care where you place it, so long as this purpose is served.

         

          You will note that a section of the Old Spanish Trail is also shown on the Map.  I presume that your Chapter has had Mr. Leon Sugar speak on the subject of tracing the Old Spanish Trail.  He wrote an excellent article on this some years ago in the Quarterly.  Also, if you have not already done so, I suggest that you have Mr. Cory speak to you sometime on the subject of “Historic Place-Names of Calcasieu.”  He has done a lot of work on that subject.

 

          I have an acknowledgement from Mr. Dart of your application for membership, and that it is to start with January.  You will probably not be formally elected to membership until the meeting next month.  If you do not receive the January Quarterly within the next 30 days, let me know, so that I can have it sent.  The April Quarterly is not yet out – I have just gone over the proof.  Delayed on account of the financial situation.

 

          Federal Court will not meet in Lake Charles until May 15, which is after your meeting, and I will hurry the map to you early next week.

 

          I shall try to get a copy of the Old Spanish Trail map that you speak of.  

                                               

Yours very sincerely,

(Signed)

J. Fair Hardin

 

I suggest that in framing the map, you include with it, sewed to the wide margin, the clipping of Mr. Cory’s article from the Press, if you can get a copy of it.  It will explain and add interest to the map.  But if you do this, correct in ink the typographical error in the date 1882 which should be 1832. That issue of the Press is exhausted (I tried to get a copy) and you might have that reprinted in connection with your presentation. 

 


  

United States Department of the Interior

General Land Office

Washington

 

April 21, 1933

 

In reply please refer to WB “E” 1492848

 

Mrs. A. F. Davies

Fenton, Louisiana

 

My dear Madam:

 

          In compliance with your request of April 10, 1933, I have mailed, under separate cover, to the above address, one photolithographic copy of the plat of T. 9S., R. 8W., La. M., Louisiana, 1830-32, giving the information desired.

 

Amount received in payment                                $0.50

 Amount earned                                                     $0.50 

Amount returned, check inclosed                      ______  

Please remit                                                        ______

 

Very respectfully,

(Signed) D. K. Parrott

Acting  Assistant Commissioner

 


 

Letter from Mrs. A. M. Mayo to Mrs. A. F. Davies

 

Dear Hattie,

 

          Under separate cover, I am sending five photos.

 

          I feared you would think we had neglected the matter, but it has been difficult to get a good day.  Also Seaman was unable to leave his work in the middle of the forenoon or afternoon (time required) so finally Mr. Mayo got photographer Murray and went with him.  First they took views of the cemetery, but did not remember the site of the old Cantonment. Last night he brought me the latter picture.

 

          I have marked the site of the Cantonment Atkinson in ink X on photo (See blueprint).

 

          I also send (enclosed) multigraph copy of the Rio Hondo Claim of Jas. Barnett assignee of Joshua Johnson.  Copies of which we place in abstracts of all land between river and township line (reaching below Division St.) and west of Hodges St.

 

          I also give a short resume to help make it clear.

 

          We are very glad to do this and sorry that it could not reach you sooner.  Hope it is in time for you to send.

         

Yours lovingly

(Signed)  Minnie K. Mayo

 


 

Friday, January 28, 1927

Lake Charles

 

          Pages 1, 2, & 3 of abstract taken from Volume IV, American State Papers give history of “Neutral Territory” disputed ground between Spain (Texas territory) and U. S. (Louisiana Purchase in 1804).

 

          Page 4.  Rio Hondo Claim #265 Jas. Barnett assignee of Joshua Johnson (Vol. IV, pg. 140) showing it was inhabited and cultivated prior to 1819 (Confirmed in 1824).

 

          Blue Print copy of survey approved Mar. 3, 1832 gives “Cantonment Atkinson.”  No other record of this can be found.  I have added this from the Govt. plat to the blue print which (the blue print) belongs to, and is a part of the patent, page 7.  The site of this is also seen in photo marked X (Murrey #1163, see right hand corner) “The Storm” tore the old trees.  At this X was the old Bilbo home, the back part of which was of logs.  The old log house was there in 1885 when I came here, but was added to soon after.  It was all torn away when J. A. Bel Lumber Co. purchased the old place of Mrs. Elmira Bilbo.

 

          The Bilbo heirs reserved the acre used for a cemetery.

 

          Deed from Jas. Barnett to Thos. Bilbo, dated Feb. 18, 1837, page 11 refiled pg 12.  Succession of Thos. Bilbo, pg. 13, who died in 1846.  Buried in the old Bilbo cemetery, adjoining the home lot.

 

          We have not been able to find which are the tombs of Thos. Bilbo and his wife, but think they are the tombs on the left side Murrey 1160-C.  Thos. Bilbo died in 1846, but old settlers tell me there were graves there several years before that, which is probable, for Calcasieu was a Parish in 1840 and Lake Charles the parish seat a few years later.

 

          In photo 1160-D looking toward the right you see the broken tombs of Thos. Bilbo and wife – looking beyond that is the site of the Cantonment you will recognize by the trees and buildings.

 

          We may find older spots than this.  We’ll keep on trying but I know of no cemetery older.  

 


 

RIO HONDO CLAIM #265

 

From the Title, Notarial and Loan Office of Mayo Title Company, Lake Charles, Louisiana

 

American State Papers.  Public Lands, Gales & Seaton’s Edition of 1859, Vol. 4, page 89. – “Claims to lands between Rio Hondo and Sabine Rivers, in Louisiana.”  Southwestern District, State of Louisiana Opelousas, La. Nov. 1, 1824.  “The Register and Receiver of the Southwestern District, in obedience to the Act of Congress entitled.  ‘An Act providing for the execution of the titles to land in that part of the State of Louisiana situated between the Rio Hondo and the Sabine River,’ approved May 26, 1824” propounded interrogatories, as follows, - “To the fourth Interrogatory, viz: - ‘What were the limits of the late neutral territory as considered by the ancient authorities of Texas and Louisiana?’

 

“Answer by Samuel Davenport: ‘The neutral territory comprehended all the tract of country lying east of the Sabine River and west of the River Quelqueshue,  Bayou Kisachey, then branch of the River called “Old River,” from the Kisachey up to the mouth of Bayou Don Manuel, southwest of  Bayou Don Manuel, Lake Terre Noir, and Aroye Hondo, and south of Red River, to the Northwestern boundary of the State of Louisiana.’

 

“Answer of Jose M. Mora:  ‘I have no knowledge of the neutral ground as to its boundaries, but from the Hondo to the Sabine River.’

Answer of Georgia Mora: ‘In the years 1794 and 1795 I collected the titles of all inhabitants who lived or who had stocks west of the River Calcasieu, of the Bayou Kisachey, of Bayou Don Manuel and Rio Hondo, and south of Red River, which were at that time within the jurisdiction of the Nacogdoches and on the line of the province of Louisiana.’  “Did the Spanish authorities of Nacogdoches exercise jurisdiction over that scope of country?”

 

“Answer by Samuel Davenport:  ‘The inhabitants of the neutral territory were recognized as belonging to the jurisdiction of Nacogdoches and Spanish authorities considered their right of jurisdiction (Civil) not taken away by the arrangement entered into between General Wilkinson and Governor Herrara in the year 1806, yet it was seldom exercised or enforced.’ It appears to be a historical fact that the strip of country called the neutral territory was early disputed by the ancient Governors of Louisiana and Texas, both alternately assuming and repelling jurisdiction over it, and even after both provinces were united under the jurisdiction of Spain the dispute did not subside, but was kept alive and perpetuated by the jealousies of the local commandants.  In the situation the United States acquired Louisiana, and the subject of controversy was not agitated until the convention between General Wilkinson and the Spanish Commander in 1806. A copy of this instrument could not be procured, but we were informed by Mr. John Cortes, a respectable merchant of Natchitoches who acted as interpreter on that occasion, that nothing was therein decided as to limits, that both parties should withdraw their forces from the neutral ground, that the question of sovereignty should remain subject to the amicable adjustment of the two superior Governments.”

 

Gales & Seaton’s Edition, Vol. 4, page 140.

 

(Then follows the listing of claims testimony supporting same, and recommendations respecting each claim, as follows):  265 James Barnett, of the parish of St. Landry, assignee of Joshua Johnson filed his notice claiming, by virtue of inhabitation, occupation, and cultivation, a tract of land lying within the late neutral territory, situated on the west bank of the Quelqueshue River, adjoining below the claim of David Choat, on which Mrs. Coleman now lives, containing testimony taken before the board:  “William Smith and Burrell Frank, being both duly sworn, say they know the land claimed by James Barnett in his foregoing notice, that said land is lying and situated as is therein described, that the same was inhabited, occupied, and cultivated by Joshua Johnson (under whom the claimant holds) by his living and growing corn, &c. thereon, on and previous to February 22, 1819, that said inhabitation, occupation, and cultivation has been uninterruptedly continued by the claimant and those under whom he holds, since that period to the present time, and that the claimant’s improvement on the land claimed embraces about eighty acres.”  We are of the opinion this claim ought to be confirmed, and in the abstract has classed it with claims of the third class.  (Signed)  Valentine King, Register.  David L. Todd, Receiver

 


 

American State Papers.  Pubic Lands, Gales & Seaton’s Edition, Vol. 4, page 146.  Abstract of claim reported.

 

Third Class:  No. 265, Name of Claimant:  James Barnett, assignee of Joshua Johnson.

Situation of Claim, River Quelqueshue. Acres, 640

 

Entry: Dated ---

From the Record of the Abstracts of Entries Furnished from the United States Land Office at New Orleans, Louisiana.

 

United States to: James Barnett, Assignee of Joshua Johnson

Description of tract selected and confirmed, -

East portion of lot 2 to embrace 40 acres, and old improvements,

Lots 3, 4, & 5, Sec. 30 T 9S. R. 8 W., Lots 3, 4, & 1 and N 1/2 Sec. 31 T. 9 S. R. 8 W., NW 1/2 of NW 1/4 Sec. 32 T. 9 S R 8 W.

Quantity Located, 640 acres.

Date of Report or Certificate, Nov. 1, 1824.

Date of Approval or Confirmation, May 24, 1828.

Date of Patent, June 12, 1893.  Certificate located, 265, Dec. 13, 1852.

Description of land finally patented, Lot 1, N 1/2 Lot 2, Lot 4 Sec. 31 T. 9 S. R. 8 W., 276.89 acres.

 


 

Patent, Dated, June 12 1893

Filed, August 2, 1893. (125).

Recorded Book 5, page 162.

 

* See Statement  

United States to: James Barnett, Assignee of Joshua Johnson

Recites:  “Whereas it appears by the Act of Congress approved on the 24th day on May A. D. 1828, entitled, “An Act to confirm claims to land in the District between the Rio Hondo and Sabine Rivers founded on habitation and cultivation, that “James Barnett, assignee of Joshua Johnson was confirmed in his claim entered as No. 265, third class, in the report dated Nov. 1, 1824, of the Register and Receiver at Opelousas, La., acting under authority of the Act of Congress approved on the 3rd day of March, A. D. 1823, entitled, “An Act providing for the examination of the title to land in that part of the State of Louisiana situated between the Rio Hondo and Sabine rivers,” and the legislation supplemental thereto:  And whereas it appears by evidence on file  in the General Land Office of the Untied Sates that the aforesaid claim of James Barnett, assignee of Joshua Johnson, was duly located by the Register and Receiver of the U. S. Land Office at Opelousas, La., pursuant to the provisions of the second section of said act of May 24, A.D. 1828, upon a part of  Secs. 31 & 32 in Twp. 9 S. R. 8 W., in the late Southwestern Land District of La., containing 276.89 acres, and whereas there has been deposited in the General Land Office plat of survey and description notes of the aforesaid claim duly examined and approved by Charles B. Wilson, Surveyor General for the State of La., on the 23rd day of May  A.D. 1893, which said plat and description notes are herein inserted and made a part of these presents, and are in the words and figures, to-wit: -(See following instrument of this abstract)-

 

“Now know ye, that the United States of America in consideration of the premises and pursuant to Section 2447 of the Revised Statutes of the U. S.  has given granted and by these presents does give and grant unto the said James Barnett, assignee of Joshua Johnson, his heirs and assigns the tract of land described in the foregoing survey, but with the stipulation contained in the said Section 2447, that this Patent “Shall only operate as a relinquishment of the title on the part of the United States and shall in no manner interfere with any valid adverse right to the same land nor be construed to preclude a legal investigation and decision by the proper judicial tribunal between adverse claimant to the said land.”

 

(Signed)  By the President Grover Cleveland.  By E. MacFarland, Asst. Secty.  L. Q. C. Lamar, Recorder of the General Land Office.  (Seal).

 


 

Plat  Dated June 13, 1893.

Filed, August 2, 1893. (125).

Recorded Book 5, page 163.

 

* See Statement

The United States of America to: James Barnett, and his Heirs and Assigns   

Sketch of Plat with Patent, showing location of lands confirmed and patented.

 

The above Plat represents the survey of a Private Land Claim in favor of James Barnett, which Claim is embraced in the report the Register and Receiver of Opelousas, La., Dated Nov. 1, 1824, No. 265, 3rd class, and was confirmed by act of Congress, approved May 24, 1823, entitled “An Act to confirm claims to lands in the District between the Rio Hondo and Sabine Rivers, founded on Habitation and cultivation.” “Scale 40 chains to square inch.” Note;  This plat is part of Patent recorded August 2, 1893, Book 5, page 162. Pursuant to the provisions of the second section of said act of May 24, A. D. 1828, upon a part of Secs. 31 & 32 in Twp. 9 S. R. 8 W., in the late Southwestern Land District of La. containing 276.89 acres  and whereas there has been deposited in the General Land Office plat of survey and description notes of the aforesaid claim duly examined and approved by Charles B. Wilson, Surveyor General for the State of La., on the 23rd day of May A. D. 1893, which said plat and description notes are herein inserted and made a part of these presents, and are in the words and figures, to-wit: -(See following instrument of this abstract)-

 

“Now know ye, that the United States of America in consideration of  the premises and pursuant to Section 2447 of the Revised Statutes of the U. S. has given granted and by these presents does give and grant unto the said James Barnett, assignee of Joshua Johnson his heirs and assigns the tract of land described in the foregoing survey, but with the stipulation contained in the said Section 2447, that this Patent “Shall only operate as a relinquishment of title on the part of the United States and shall in no manner interfere with any valid adverse right to the same land nor be construed to preclude a legal investigation and decision by the proper judicial tribunal between adverse claimants to the said land.”  (Signed).  By the President Grover Cleveland.  By E. MacFarland, Asst. Secty. L. Q. C. Lamar, Recorder of the General Land Office.  (Seal).

 


 

Notarial Act.  Warranty Deed.

Dated Feb. 18, 1837. Witnesses Two.

Passed before Geo. King, Parish Judge & Ex-Off.  N. P., St. Landry Ph., La.

Was Act Authenticated?  Yes. 

Filed June 13, 1888. (190)

Recorded Book “P,” page 194.

Consideration $500.00.

 

* See Statement.                                         .

James Barnett, of the State of  Louisiana and Parish of St. Landry to: Thomas Bilbo, of the same state and parish, conveys: All his right, title,

claim and interest in and to a certain tract of land situated in the aforesaid Parish and lying on the Calcasieu River containing 640 acres, being in

Twp 9 S. R. 8 W., and Sections 30 & 31 and same confirmed to him the said Barnett as assignee of Joshua Johnson, by the Commissioners Report

No. 265. Note by Abstracters:  This is a certified copy from Book “J” page 72 At Opelousas, La.

 

 

 

Notarial Act. Warranty Deed.

Dated Feb. 18, 1837. Witnesses Two.

Passed before Geo. King. Parish Judge & Ex-Off.  N. P., St. Landry Ph., La.

Was Act Authenticated?  Yes.

Re-Filed October 5, 1916. (35867).

Recorded Book 156 page 95.                                                        

Consideration $500.00.

 

James Barnett,  of the State Louisiana and Parish of St. Landry to Thomas Bilbo, of the same State and Parish.  Conveys:  All his right, title, claim and interest in and to a certain tract of land situated in the aforesaid Parish and lying on the Calcasieu River containing 640 acres, being in Twp. 9 S. R. 8 W. and Sections 30 & 31 and the same confirmed to him and said Barnett as assignee of Joshua Johnson, by the Commissioners Report No. 265. Note by Abstracter: - This is a certified copy from Book “J” page 72 at Opelousas, La.

 


 

Succession of Thomas Bilbo.

Estate opened Oct. 3, 1846.

Probate No. 23. He died September 19, 1846.

         

*See Statement.    

Heirs Named:  Joseph L. Bilbo, William Bilbo, Rebecca G. Ryan, wife of Jacob Ryan, Nancy Reeves, wife of Isham Reeves, Ann M. Gillett, wife of Columbus Gillett, and Laura E. Bilbo all of Calcasieu Parish.  There are minor heirs residing in Texas.

Prays for will to be opened and probated.

 

HOLOGRAPHIC WILL AND TESTAMENT:   Dated April 24, 1844.

First.  I now have a wife Ann and the following children:  John, Nancy, Jane, Joseph Lawrence, William, Rebecca Gaines and Ann Moore all of majority and Laura Esther a minor.  Items Two to Six as to special bequests, etc.  Seventh.  I do constitute and appoint my said wife Ann Bilbo executrix and my two sons Joseph Lawrence Bilbo,  William Bilbo and my son-in-law Columbus Gillett, executors with full power to carry into effect this my last will and testament in all its parts as long as may be necessary without giving bond.

Will probated October 3rd, 1846, before Benoit DeBaillon, Parish Judge.

 

Inventory made October 15, 1846, mentions only movable property. Oath and Letters Testamentary, dated October 5, 1846.

Petition asking for family meeting in the interest of the Minors Thomas P. Bilbo, Sarah Ann Bilbo, Mary Jane Bilbo and Polly Dyre Bilbo, minor children of heirs of John Bilbo, deceased.

Order:  Let a family meeting (composed of relatives and friends) be convoked and held before B. DeBaillon, Parish Recorder, etc., for the interest of said minors.  Clerks office Marion, September 2, 1850, John F. Morrough Clerk.

 

Family Meeting Held.   September 2, 1850, in the interest of said minors, composed of Jos. L. Bilbo, maternal uncle, Jacob Ryan and Isham Reeves, uncle by marriage and Anselm Sallier and Nathaniel Clifton, family friends.

 

Recommendation:   That for the best interest of minors that a tract of land lying on Lake Charles be sold at public auction, payable one half cash, balance in six months from date of sale.

Account filed of testamentary executors with the estate.

  


 

Succession of Thomas Bilbo and wife Ann Lawrence.

Estate opened Sept. 2, 1874

Probate No. 361             

They died some time since.   

 

*See Statement.

Heirs. – 1st.  Heirs of John Bilbo.  Absentees. 2nd. Heirs of Nancy Bilbo, deceased, wife of Isham Reeves.  (A) George W. Reeves.  (B) Martha Reeves, wife of Isaac Williams.  (C) Heirs of Ellen Reeves deceased wife of John Hagar.  (D) William Reeves and (E) James M. Reeves.  3rd.  Heirs of Jane Bilbo, wife of W. W.  Dupree.  Absentees.  4th.  Joseph L. Bilbo.  5th.  Heirs of William Bilbo.  (A) Heirs of J. L. Bilbo.  (B) Mary Ann Bilbo, wife of Newland Cole.  (C) Ellen Bilbo, wife of Monroe Lindsay.  (D) Columbus Bilbo.  (E) Susan Bilbo, wife of John McNeese.  (F) Ralph Bilbo.  (G) Thomas Bilbo. (H) Rebecca Bilbo.  6th. Heirs of Rebecca G. Bilbo, deceased, wife of Jacob Ryan.   A- J. L. Ryan.  B- Geo. W. Ryan.  C- J. Anderson Ryan.  D- J. Ira Ryan.  E- Ann Ryan, wife of F. R. Houston.  F- Laura Ryan, wife of James P. Geary.  G- Martha Ryan, wife of B. R. Stoddard.  H- Margaret I. Ryan, wife of R. L. Belden. I- W. Porter Ryan, minor.  7th. Ann Bilbo, wife of Columbus Gillett.  8th. Heirs of Laura E. Bilbo, deceased, wife of John S. Johnson, Absentee. Petition of Joseph L. Bilbo, a brother of William Bilbo, both of Calcasieu Ph. Filed Sept. 2, 1874 represents that their father and mother, Thomas Bilbo and wife, Ann Lawrence, both now deceased, died some time since leaving estate consisting principally of real estate and some personal property.  Petitioners pray that Jacob Ryan be appointed administrator. 

 

Order signed Sept. 8, 1874 appointing Jacob Ryan administrator and commission issued to John A. Spence to take inventory.

 

Inventory taken Nov. 5, 1874, J. Ben Kirkman, Dy. Rec. and W. H. Haskell and W. L. Hutchins, appraisers.

 

That for further description of all the foregoing property, see plat of survey made by Frank Moore, November 1, 1874 on file and same is approved by Louis Leveque, Esquire, the attorney appointed to represent absent heirs.

 

Administrator Jacob Ryan and bond for $6000.00 filed November 8, 1875.

 

Natural Tutor, Jacob Ryan.  Under Tutor, Simeon Vincent.

 

Petition of Jacob Ryan for Family Meeting in the interest of minor Monroe Porter Ryan, son of Rebecca Bilbo Ryan, one the legal heirs of this Succession. 

 

Filed Dec. 1, 1875.

 

Commission issued to J. B. Kirkman, Dy. Rec. Dec. 1, 1875 to hold Family Meeting.

 

Family Meeting held Dec. 6, 1875 before said Kirkman and Isaac Vincent, Lastie Reon, J. V. Moss, M. J. Rosteet, Wm. Meyers in the interest of Porter Ryan, minor child of Rebecca Bilbo deceased.

 

Recommendation.  That a sale is necessary and asking that sale be ordered and to fix the terms of said sale and declaring themselves unanimously of the opinion that the property belonging to the said succession be sold at public auction as soon as legal delays are given on following terms and condition to wit:- 10% cash, and 1 and 2 years credit on the balance from the date of sale, purchasers executing their promissory notes with good and solvent security, with 8% per annum interest from maturity until paid.

 

Petition and order for homologation of proceedings of Family Meeting, filed December 13, 1975.

Order of Sale of SALE Dec. 13, 1875.  It is ordered that property belonging to Succession of Thomas Bilbo and Ann Lawrence be sold according to law after legal advertisement upon following terms, viz: - Same terms as in Family Meeting.

 

Commission issued to Jacob Ryan, Administrator to sell, that Louis Leveque, Esquire, be notified of this order.  Singed – D. J. Reid, Parish Judge.  “I hereby accept service of above petition and waive citation and approve sale and condition of sale, having no objections to make.  Signed – Louis Leveque, Attorney for absent heirs.”

 

Sale Made Jan. 17, 1876.  See Book “F” page 38, etc.

 

Account filed Nov. 15, 1892.

 


 

*See Statement.

Succession  361

Note by Abstracter:  From the Lake Charles Echo of October 3-10-17-24 and Nov. 7, 1874, the following data is taken. - (1)

 

“Succession Notice”

 

Estate of Thomas Bilbo, and his wife, Ann Lawrence, both deceased.

The petition of Joseph L. Bilbo and William Bilbo, to have Jacob Ryan appointed Administrator of said Estates.

State of Louisiana, Parish of Calcasieu, in Parish Court.

Whereas, Jacob Ryan has filed in the Clerk’s Office, at Lake Charles, his application to be appointed administrator of the Succession of Thomas Bilbo and his wife, Ann Lawrence, deceased.  Therefore notice is hereby given to all persons who have opposition to make thereto to the same within ten clear days from the first publication of this notice or he will be appointed as prayed for in his petition.  By order of the court, this the 1st day of October, A. D. 1874.

 

Asa Ryan, Clerk of said Court.

Lake Charles, October 1st, 1874 -2

 


 

 *See Statement.

Succession 361.

Note by Abstractor: - From the Lake Charles Echo of Dec. 16, 23 and 30, 1875 and Jan. 6, 13, 1876, the following data is taken, (2)

 

“State of Louisiana, Parish of Calcasieu"

 

Succession of Thos. Bilbo and Ann Lawrence, deceased - No. 86.  By virtue of a commission issued and to me directed from the Hon. the Parish Court, in and for the Parish and State aforesaid, in the above numbered and entitled Successions,  I,  Jacob Ryan, Administrator of said Successions,  will proceed to sell at the Court House door in said Parish at public auction, to the highest bidder, on Monday the 17th day of January, 1876, the following described property, belonging to said Successions, to-wit: - All of the above property is described and will be sold in accordance with a map and plan of subdivision make by Frank Moore, Surveyor, Nov. 1, 1874, and on file in the Recorder’s office.

Terms of Sale: -Ten per cent cash on each adjudication, and for the Balance purchasers to furnish their promissory notes with good and solvent security to furnish their promissory notes with good and solvent security to the satisfaction of the Administrator, payable in two equal installments, in one and two years from day of sale, and bearing eight percent per annum interest from maturity until paid, special mortgage and vendor’s privilege to be retained on the property sold until full and final payment of said notes and interest.  Jacob Ryan, Administrator.  Lake Charles, Dec. 16. 1875.

  


 

*See Statement.

Succession 361

Note by Abstracter: - From the Lake Charles Echo of March 13, 20 and 27, 1880, the following data is taken: - (3)

 

“Final Tableau”

         

In the Parish Court of Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

Succession of Thomas Bilbo and Ann Lawrence

Jacob Ryan, Administrator of the Succession of Thomas Bilbo and Ann Lawrence, deceased, having filed in my office a Final Tableau and Account of his administration of said succession, and of distribution of the funds thereof, with his petition praying for the homologation of the same.

 

Public notice is hereby given to the creditors of said succession, and to all persons interested therein, of said filing of said tableau and account and they are hereby cited to appear before said Parish Court and show cause why said tableau and account should not be approved and homologated, and they are hereby notified that if no written opposition thereto is filed in the office of the Clerk of said Court, at the Court House, in the town of Lake Charles, in said Parish, within ten days from March 13, 1888, the said final tableau and account will be approved and homologated.

 

Witness the Honorable, David J. Reid, Judge, of said Court, this 10th day of March, A.D. 1880.

T. B. Ferren, D’y. Clerk.

 

March 13, 1880.

 


  

LAKE CHARLES ONCE SITE OF MILITARY POST

 

          Editor American Press:   I wonder if all of your readers know that there was once a regularly established military post in Lake Charles.  Well, there was, but it was a long time ago.  It came about in this way.

 

          When President Thomas Jefferson bought the province of Louisiana in 1803, its western boundary had never been fixed.  Spain claimed the ground nearly to the middle of what is now the state of Louisiana, while France claimed it as far west as the Trinity or Brazos River. There was absolutely nothing here to fuss about except wilderness; but they disputed, Spanish troops marched over nearly to the Red River and French and afterward American soldiers made sorties out on the plains. When the United States acquired Louisiana, they took prompt action to maintain their rights.  The war department established old Fort Jessup up west of Natchitoches in what is now Sabine Parish, where Lieutenant Ulysses S. Grant put in part of his apprenticeship as a soldier.  Irregular lands from both sides kept up the quarrel which though not real war, was very much like it.  The things that were done in Southwest Louisiana and in eastern Texas occupy a very small place in history, because they were not spectacular.  There were not great battles, but the result was of vast importance to all this region and to the nation.

 

          In 1819 the United States and Spain agreed on the Sabine River as the international boundary; but the border troubles and the counter claims kept going for a long time afterward.

 

          During this troublous time and to avoid real war the United States war department established Camp Atkinson on what is now a part of the city of Lake Charles.  The musty and yellow old files in the department at Washington show that it was planted on “an extension of the Calcasieu River, near the present site of the town of Lake Charles, Louisiana, in lat. 30° 13', long.  16° 12' from Washington.”  (You will observe that while the land here had just been surveyed and sectionized by the surveyor general’s office, the maps had not yet got to the war department, so it is described by latitude and longitude instead of by section, township, and range). 

 

          Camp Atkinson was established in April 1830 by Captain George Birch and his Company E, 7th United States infantry and was named in honor of Colonel and Brevet Brigadier General Henry Atkinson who was in command of the western department.

 

          If you will drive out some evening to the foot of Lawrence Street, you may drive northwestward near the shore of the lake on the good shell road so long used by the J. A. Bel lumber company and now used as a road to city dumping ground, farther west, you will pass just north of the big abandoned office building of the mill company and on through the encroaching vines and brush near the Bilbo cemetery and stop your car near scattered relics of the old J. A. Bel mill, built long years after the military left there, you will be near the center of the ground which was Camp Atkinson.  The road is perfectly good and solid and the surroundings not unpleasant to any one who likes the wild, the vigorous bushes and shrubs and vines are doing their best to hide the scars and if you can imagine, the really fine high grounds cleared of the rubbish, and trees just enough for beauty, with post buildings and parade grounds in order, with the lake spreading away off to the southwest, you may have some idea of this resting place in the wilderness as it was a century ago.

 

          In November 1831, Captain Birch and his company were ordered elsewhere and were succeeded by Captain T. J. Harrison with his company F of the 3rd U. S. infantry.  In January, 1832, just a century ago last January, the post was abandoned and the troops were removed to Fort Jessup, which I just mentioned.

 

          So far as the record relates no fighting or trouble ever occurred in this neighborhood. Perhaps the building of the post here prevented it.  Trouble is frequently avoided by being ready for it.  No one can tell.  But in any event while cherishing the memory of Camp Atkinson as an interesting passage in local history, we may all take pride in the fact that the Calcasieu valley is still as it has always been, the valley of peace.

 

          General Henry Atkinson, for whom Camp Atkinson was named, had been appointed by President Monroe in 1832 as the first adjutant general of the United States, when that office was created, and he was referred to by the President as “an officer of great merit.”  Later he was selected by President John Quincy Adams as a commissioner to make a treaty with the Pancar Indians.  Still later, in 1825, the president in his message speaks highly of his work as commander in the campaign against the Winnebagos and other tribes in Illinois.  And still later, in 1832, he had the distinguished honor of being the only one personally named of the officers who with General Winfield Scott were so highly commended by President Andrew Jackson for leadership in the Indian campaigns in Illinois and Michigan.  President Jackson knew real military merit, so the people of Lake Charles may take pride in having the name of General Henry Atkinson so closely associated with the birth of the city.

 

Charles E. Cory. 

Lake Charles, La.

Sept. 27, 1932 

(Lake Charles American Press)

 


 

SOURCE MATERIAL

 

Abstract:  Bilbo Succession.  Mayo Title Company, Lake Charles, La. Rio Hondo Claim #265.

 

American State Papers:  Public Lands, “Claims to Lands between Rio Hondo and Sabine Rivers, in Louisiana," Vol. 4, pp. 89, 90, 91, and 140.

 

Mayo, Mrs. A. M.  Letter to Mrs. A. F. Davies, 1927.

 

National Archives and Records Service, Washington.  Letter from Richard G. Wood, Chief, Army Section, War Records Branch, to Mr. Sam H. Jones.

 

Library of Congress, Washington.  Quotations from: Workers of the Writers’ Program, Louisiana, A Guide to the State, New York: Hastings House, 1941, p. 282, and (former) Historical Section of the Army War College with comment and evaluation by Harold E. Snide, History and General Research Section, Library of Congress, 1951.

 

Hardin, J. Fair. Letters, 3, to Mrs. A. F. Davies, 1933.

 

General Land Office, United States Department of the Interior. Letter to Mrs. A. F. Davies, 1933.

 

National Archives and Records Service, General Services Administration, Washington.  Letter from T. A. Thompson, M. C. to Mrs. John S. Weitz, 1955.

 

Louisiana, A Guide to the State, American Guide Series.  New York, Hastings House, 1941, pp. 46, 47, 282, 652.

 

Numerous letters from the War Department, National Archives, Historical Societies, and other sources:  received by Chapter members in the 1930’s, data copied – original letters not in Chapter files.

 

Cory, Charles E.  “Lake Charles Once Site of Military Post.”  Lake Charles American Press, 1932.

 


 

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